Endangered Species Campaigns

2018 Endangered Species Campaign raised $260 in loose change in May 2017!  

The students also voted to sponsor the Poweshiek Skipperling, which is native to Oakland county, although its habitat is threatened.  Funds will be donated to the Minnesota Zoo Native Butterfly Propagation Program. Eggs collected from female skipperlings in Oakland County are raised in the Minnesota Zoo.  When the caterpillars become butterflies, they are released back to Oakland County in the summer.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/oakland/2018/07/13/michigan-most-endangered-species-poweshiek-skipperling-butterfly/772320002/

http://mnzoo.org/conservation/minnesota/saving-minnesotas-prairie-butterfly-heritage/

Other 2018 nominees (all native to Michigan and to Oakland County)

Two freshwater mussels: Snuffbox and Rayed Bean, Eastern Massasauga (rattlesnake).

Addition information is available at:

https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/reptiles/eama/index.html

https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/clams/rayedbean/RayedBeanFactSheet.html

https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/clams/snuffbox/SnuffboxFactSheet.html

https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/insects/posk/PoweshiekSkipperlingFactSheet.html

Serviceberry tree planted Arbor Day 2018

This tree is native born and raised in Michigan and will be hardy enough to survive harsh, Michigan winters.

Aimed at conserving the habitat of the Indiana Bat (winner of 2017 Endangered Species Sponsorship), but helps all native fauna from the robins and bats to the microbes in the soil.

Flowers in the spring, leading to dried berries for robins in early fall.

Will grow to 12 feet tall and 9 feet wide.

Reminders to help our new tree flourish:

  • Please leave flowers and berries for the birds and other wildlife.
  • Please leave the mulch on the ground to protect the soil.
  • Please leave the bark to protect the tree.

With the funds collected during 2017 “For the Love of Michigan, helping Endangered Species and Threatened organisms” campaign, the Parent Guild purchased a Button Bush to support the Indiana Bat’s habitat. This green bush with wide green leaves is located in front of the Middle School and its white flowers will attract the bats at dusk when the bats begin their hunting. A rain barrel has also been installed near the native garden to help conserve water runoff and to help water the nearby plantings.

2017 Nominees: Indiana Bat, Eastern Massasauga, Northern Long-Eared Bat, Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid